A spirited send-off

April 13, 2016 § 1 Comment

ka_pitz

Ken Auster | The Pitz

IT TOOK PLACE in a church, but the first part of the remembrance of life weekend for painter Ken Auster was a decidedly irreverent affair — featuring a rock band, a ukelele interlude, and a freeform string of raucous tales from his fraternity brothers and surfing buddies.

One who’d shared a college ornithology class remembered the final exam, which showed only the legs of several birds and asked for their identity. Ken and his pal thought it was ridiculous and stood up to walk out.

“Hey, wait a minute,” shouted the professor. “You can’t just walk out. Who are you, anyway?” With that, Ken pulled up his pants leg and replied: “You tell me.”

MORE: The perfect “Ken moment”

‘A beautiful remembrance’

April 12, 2016 § 1 Comment

o5geag-b88684818z.120160410220609000gu4fta4e.10

Ken Auster was remembered with a paint-out and a paddle-out in Laguna Beach.

LAGUNA BEACH – Those who knew Ken Auster say Sunday’s celebration of his life was the perfect “Ken moment,” combining his passion for the things he most loved – art and surfing.

The event – held by the Laguna Plein Air Painters Association – included a morning paint-out at Main Beach and an afternoon paddle-out from Heisler Park’s Picnic Beach.

“This is the best of the best,” said Paulette Martinson Auster, his wife, before heading out at Picnic Beach for the paddle-out near Bird Rock. “It’s a beautiful remembrance of his life. He loved art. He was a waterman.”

MORE: The perfect “Ken moment”

Celebrating Ken Auster

March 31, 2016 § Leave a comment

Ken Auster_Celebration of Life

The ambiguities of pleasure

March 4, 2016 § Leave a comment

bonnard_13_les-danseuses_print

Pierre Bonnard | Les danseuses

REVIEW | JEROME TARSHIS

When I first read that the Legion of Honor in San Francisco was going to have a Pierre Bonnard show, I looked forward to an hour or two or three devoted to simple pleasure. “A happy painter of happy pictures” was the idea I’d been carrying in my head.

What’s more, I had a memory to go with the idea. Many years ago the Museum of Modern Art in New York had a Bonnard show on the same floor as a show of Robert Motherwell’s sad paintings collectively titled Elegies to the Spanish Republic. (By sheer chance, I trust, San Francisco’s De Young Museum opened a small show of the Elegies last fall.)

At MOMA, all those years ago, the Motherwell galleries were empty and the Bonnard galleries crowded with people who wanted happy pictures. And so, looking at the title of the current retrospective, Pierre Bonnard: Painting Arcadia, I thought I was in for another “happiness wins, elegy loses” comparison, on a large scale. The exhibition was organized jointly by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the Musée d’Orsay, in Paris, which has the world’s leading Bonnard collection, and the Fundación MAPFRE, in Madrid.

Nothing so simple. There are enough outwardly happy pictures to be going on with, but my overall impression was that the subtitle could have been and possibly should have been Painting Arcadia, or, the Ambiguities of Pleasure.

« Read the rest of this entry »

From a local collection

March 3, 2016 § Leave a comment

Getty

From Ann Getty Interior Style

MOST OF THE paintings now on view in Pierre Bonnard: Painting Arcadia at the Legion of Honor in San Francisco traveled from international destinations — many from the d’Orsay Museum in Paris.

But not all. Two from the Ann and Gordon Getty Collection only had to travel across town. Above, at left center, Bonnard’s The Two Carriages is pictured before the exhibition began in its usual place in the Gettys’ living room.

getty-bonnard

Pierre Bonnard | The Two Carriages

MORE: “Inside the Getty mansion

Aloha, Ken Auster

January 30, 2016 § 18 Comments

Ken Auster painting on location in San Francisco in 2014.

WE ARE SAD to share the news that the artist Ken Auster died yesterday, January 29, 2016, at his home in Laguna Beach, California. He was 66, and had been battling metastatic prostate cancer for a decade.

Auster burst onto the resurgent California plein-air scene in the mid-1990s and became one of the country’s most respected location painters. Within a few years he had won nearly every major plein-air painting competition and had successive sold-out gallery exhibitions.

“My life in art started when I was a kid,” he wrote in his 2011 book, Intellect and Passion. “I can remember being yelled at for drawing surfers screaming down humongous pen and ink waves at the top of my homework assignments.”

He grew up near the water in Long Beach and surfing was a major part of his life. During his college years at Long Beach State University, he combined his interest in art and surfing and began silkscreening T-shirts. Eventually, after living in Hawaii, he established a successful surf art business and his work was seen around the world.

Despite his success, he decided at mid-career he wanted to be a fine artist.

“A lot of artists start by trying to be painters, then de-evolve into commercial work to make money,” he said. “I started with surf art on T-shirts and worked my way up.”

Painting on location was his breakthrough.

“One day I was invited to go out with a few friends and paint on location at a local beach,” he wrote in his book. “I set up and started painting what I saw. The experience was a turning point in my life. Here was the bare bones of art — no process and minimal equipment, just a burst of passion and paint, with immediate results and gratification. It just happened and it was beautiful.”

Auster’s first exhibition was presented by the Thomas Reynolds Gallery in San Francisco in 1997. It sold out. So did his second and third. His work was widely published, and he went on to exhibit at galleries nationwide. He was also a natural as a teacher, offering workshops around the country and a series of videos.

“Ken Auster was the real deal,” said Reynolds. “He was a terrific painter, a great teacher and a wonderful human being — and he always made it fun, from his clever titles to his endless one-liners that seemed to flow without effort. The world has lost a great artist.”

He is survived by his wife, Paulette Auster. An aloha style celebration of his life is being planned.

MORE ABOUT KEN AUSTER

Legacy of the Jewel City

January 3, 2016 § 1 Comment

Guerin_aerial

Jules Guérin | Panoramic View of the Panama-Pacific International Exposition

By NANCY BOAS

It is almost impossible to imagine how isolated California artists were from the world’s art centers and new artistic ideas before 1915. Travel was difficult. Ships had to go around South America to reach the West Coast. The Rocky Mountains and the Sierras presented their own high barriers to travel.

The Panama-Pacific International Exposition of 1915 — the focus of the “Jewel City” exhibition at the de Young Museum — had a transformational influence on the art and culture of the Bay Area.

In particular the fair was crucial in shaping the artistic development of the Society of Six, a group of plein air painters working in the Bay Area considered one of the country’s most important modernist developments in the early 20th century. Their work changed dramatically as a result of what they experienced there. « Read the rest of this entry »

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 135 other followers